Dodge SRT Viper Forums : ViperAlley banner
21 - 40 of 49 Posts

· Landscaping Professional
Joined
·
14,194 Posts
I found a thread at VOA on G3 plug wires where one of the posters included some service manual scans and I did a screen grab. I did a little mouse painting to hilight what I think is the breather plumbing, but I'd appreciate you confirming what plumbing is actually there.

All stock modern breather systems have a CCV and a PCV system. The CCV is usually plumbed to the air cleaner box from the valve cover(s) and it is generally referred to as the "clean side." I would assume the picture below is a valve cover connection. On a Gen 2, it would tee into the other valve cover, then route to the back side of the air cleaner housing.

Line Slope Font Parallel Music


The Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) is the "dirty side" and there is usually a line from the block somewhere below the head(s). The PCV dirty side should feed to the intake manifold behind the throttle bodies on a N.A. setup as shown below. There should be a PCV valve, or a drilled orifice to control flow rates.
Human body Gesture Elbow Font Art


Yours has a standard PCV valve on the valve cover. I don't know if that is a normal location or not. Chances are strong that it doesn't work correctly with boost pressure.
Hood Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Automotive exterior Gas


For forced induction, you will want to do some research on best plumbing recommendations. Perhaps look at a Radium Engineering kit for a modern turbo engine setup for clues. They have some really well engineered components with great installation instructions.

Mr. TxVault in post #11 has a very nice setup! It would be nice to see how his catch can system is plumbed.

I stopped by my dealer's parts counter after lunch and looked at the PCV parts list. Here's what it shows: Driver's (clean) side rear goes under the manifold and connects to the air cleaner housing. Passenger (dirty) side has a baffle or filter material in the valve cover to separate oil from the PCV air. It parallels the CCV line and elbows up into the bottom of the intake behind the butterflies. I would suggest still running a small catch can on the dirty side and look at getting rid of the PCV valve if your emissions system sticker doesn't show one.
Font Slope Parallel Diagram Music
 

· Landscaping Professional
Joined
·
14,194 Posts
Simplest explanation is they swapped banks with them. It does shorten the plumbing runs and puts the oil filler cap up front. That also makes it more likely to pull oil vapor straight to the manifold. The OE piping allows it to coalesce on the tubing walls.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Some updates... getting there slowly but surely. Still have some confusion about the knock sensors. The wiring harness I got has a knock sensor wired directly into it. I'm assuming it was originally made for a 2003/2004 car, which didn't have factory knock sensors. I reached out to RSI, they told me to remove one of the factory knock sensors and use the one that came with the AEM wiring in it's place. I'm hoping that will work. I was contemplating leaving the factory knock sensors in place and drilling a third hole somewhere and installing the AEM knock sensor there. Any thoughts on this?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
New injector pigtails installed. Tried to make them look as factory as possible.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive fuel system Automotive exterior


Wiring harness installed
Automotive design Motor vehicle Computer hardware Automotive exterior Automotive tire


working on installing the RSI oil cooler lines
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exhaust Bumper


RSI power steering pressure lines installed
Automotive fuel system Hood Car Automotive tire Motor vehicle


Turbos back in
Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive exhaust Gas

Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive lighting


working on the new rails, injectors, cleaning up the intake. Excuse the messy bench.
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Engineering


Tire Wheel Watch Automotive tire Motor vehicle
 

· Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hit a snag installing the new fuel pump hanger. It's about 1" too long and hits the bottom of the tank before it can seal at the top. There is some adjustment in the hanger itself, but the fuel lines are too long for it to be adjusted. I guess I will need to figure out some new lines.
Fluid Automotive tire Office ruler Gas Liquid


Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Gas Automotive tire Cable


Hood Automotive tire Vehicle Automotive design Car
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Few questions on this. Where are you mounting the Fuel regulator? Also how are you running the fuel rails in parallels with the end caps like that? Don't you need a feed and return? Where are you mounting the ECU? It looks like the 4 guys possibly mount the ECU on top of the factory ECU? Running a gen 4 coolant hose bay help with this.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Few questions on this. Where are you mounting the Fuel regulator? Also how are you running the fuel rails in parallels with the end caps like that? Don't you need a feed and return? Where are you mounting the ECU? It looks like the 4 guys possibly mount the ECU on top of the factory ECU? Running a gen 4 coolant hose bay help with this.
Not the OP but it looks like he is doing something similar…

My FPR mounts behind the intake manifold. Many mount it along the firewall here. Mine uses a bracket from RSI.

The fuel lines run in one rail to a crossover line under the front of the rails, into the front of the other rail, and out the back. Feed and return is used. (If you look towards the top of the page where OP has a pic of his manifold on a bench you can see the unhooked front crossover line going towards the front of the DS rail.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Not the OP but it looks like he is doing something similar…

My FPR mounts behind the intake manifold. Many mount it along the firewall here. Mine uses a bracket from RSI.

The fuel lines run in one rail to a crossover line under the front of the rails, into the front of the other rail, and out the back. Feed and return is used. (If you look towards the top of the page where OP has a pic of his manifold on a bench you can see the unhooked front crossover line going towards the front of the DS rail.
Any Pictures of that?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Few questions on this. Where are you mounting the Fuel regulator? Also how are you running the fuel rails in parallels with the end caps like that? Don't you need a feed and return? Where are you mounting the ECU? It looks like the 4 guys possibly mount the ECU on top of the factory ECU? Running a gen 4 coolant hose bay help with this.
The fuel regulator mounts behind the intake. I'm waiting on a replacement bracket from RSI. The one they sent me was for a Gen 5 and was too tall. At first I thought I was doing something wrong, but after trying every possible location for it and calling RSI multiple times, they finally figured out they sent me the wrong bracket. See picture attached. You can see the regulator sitting too high and hitting the wiper base plate.
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive fuel system Automotive design


I've attached the fuel line routing "diagram" RSI provided me with. That explains pretty clearly how to run the fuel lines.
Font Parallel Rectangle Auto part Slope

I'm putting the ECU inside the cabin. I was not comfortable leaving it in the engine bay, it does not seem like it's water proof. The harness was long enough to go inside through the grommet on the firewall on the driver side.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
My RSI bracket looks nothing like that for my Gen3. I don’t have an installed pic but here it is from a pic I had of more stuff it just happened to be in. I know you mentioned they sent you the wrong one…

Wood Door Bumper Material property Automotive exterior
 

· Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
So I got tired of waiting for the new bracket from RSI and decided to cut up the one they sent me. I made it about 1.5" shorter and notched the base for the return fuel line to fit. Was finally able to hook everything up and put the intake back on. Tested the fuel system, pumps prime like they should, no leaks anywhere. Only issue I have is that I don't know what my fuel pressure is at. The fuel lines don't have a provision for a 1/8" NPT fuel pressure gauge. So, I'm taking off the end cap from the passenger side fuel rail and replacing with it a -8 ORB to 1/8" NPT adapter. I can then put in either an analog gauge or a pressure gauge for the AEM. I was originally going to put a gauge on the FPR, but there's simply no room and I wouldn't be able to see the gauge anyway.

Anyway, tried to fire up the car, no luck. Pulled one of the spark plugs, checked for spark, not getting any spark. It seems that the AEM might be programmed incorrectly and not telling the coils to fire, or there's another issue. The file I have on there was from RSI, I asked them to put a decent tune on there so I could start the car and drive it over to the shop for dyno tuning.

Anyway some photos.


Automotive tire Light Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior


Table Machine tool Drill Tool Wood


Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior Vehicle


Automotive fuel system Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Car



Motor vehicle Hood Vehicle Automotive design Car



Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Vehicle


Land vehicle Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Hood
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top