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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we always have these oil debates and I posted a while back about what were turbo guys running and I didn't get many answers. So here is data with me having two different Gen3 TT cars with multiple different oils. Love to hear your thoughts. I have read over and over on forums....15 or 20wt is so bad and we shouldn't have to run a 50 wt unless our motor is built loose. I see that some newer Ferrari cars run a 10w-60. So does that mean a ferrari engine is built loose....I think not!!! This oil thing is so confusing.



So in stock Viper the T6 looks to be fine. In a TT Viper the M1 15-50 is ok but the VR1 20/50 has the best analysis. It's also the regular VR1 not synthetic.
 

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So not knowing what I am looking at in regards to the analysis, is it good?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The analysis all are good. Just think the VR1 still maintained viscosity and held together better in the turbo cars.


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Looks like your motor swallowed a little dirt during your first T6 fill. When my GTS was getting tracked 4-6 times per year and street driven a lot too, I ran M1 15W-50 and only added makeup oil. I pulled samples about every 6 months and ended up extending my drain intervals up to 18 months. Fuel dilution was my key to viscosity reduction and that was my trigger for changes. I figured I was paying a premium for full synthetic and wanted my money's worth as long as it was being monitored regularly. Mine was mostly stock though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yea not sure there... but I don’t think the T6 is best for a turbo Viper. Any thoughts on this theory of 15-20 being soooo excessive and same with 50 wt.


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HD diesel oils have very robust additive packages including higher detergent levels to keep combustion byproducts suspended rather than deposited on engine surfaces. Synthetic base oils have more consistent molecule lengths for uniform load carrying performance and slower breakdown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
But my conventional oil stood up way better to my twin turbo viper than synthetic diesel oil. Both my TT vipers broke down the T6 way worse.

Am I incorrect in my analysis?


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It is possible that the smaller shaft bearings/bushings on your automotive turbos are harder on the oil than larger diesel units. Typically, autos experience much more frequent on/off cycles with the shafts turning in unpressurized oil film.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It is possible that the smaller shaft bearings/bushings on your automotive turbos are harder on the oil than larger diesel units. Typically, autos experience much more frequent on/off cycles with the shafts turning in unpressurized oil film.

Very interesting idea. That makes total sense and I've never heard anyone explain it in that way. I hear so much about Rotella, Delvac, Mobile 1 turbo diesel oil in the Viper and other cars and I agree they are great oils but I have two different turbo Vipers who didn't do as well the Rotella T6 and my other cars have done great with it.

Other thoughts or analysis?
 

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Well, i have a very simplistic view. regarding turbo vipers, i think i like the turbo diesel oils, because i'm guessing the additives are more robust at higher operating temperatures. But overall, i look agt the magnetic drainplug on every oil change, and if there are deposits, i usually go up notch in the base oil, i.e. 5w-30, to 10w-30. usually, the depsoits are no longer there with the next oil change. although the manufacturers suggest 5w-30, i've basically switched to 10w-30 on all my passenger cars.

in addition, sometimes i'll hear a little ?lifter noise, and switching up 1 grade of base oil usually quiets the engine, as well as reducing the deposits on the drain plugs

when i bought my '99 TT, there was some ?lifter noise at an idle. Not knowing what oil was in the car, i changed oil to 15w-40 synthetic diesel, and engine has quieted down. there was also some metal deposits on the drain plug.

i think the first number in oil rating is the true base oil, and the viscosity improvers (additives) thicken up the oil once oil reaches operating temperature.
 

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I believe you have it backwards. The base viscosity is the latter value. They add "pour point depressants" to enhance flow characteristics at low temperatures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, i have a very simplistic view. regarding turbo vipers, i think i like the turbo diesel oils, because i'm guessing the additives are more robust at higher operating temperatures. But overall, i look agt the magnetic drainplug on every oil change, and if there are deposits, i usually go up notch in the base oil, i.e. 5w-30, to 10w-30. usually, the depsoits are no longer there with the next oil change. although the manufacturers suggest 5w-30, i've basically switched to 10w-30 on all my passenger cars.

in addition, sometimes i'll hear a little ?lifter noise, and switching up 1 grade of base oil usually quiets the engine, as well as reducing the deposits on the drain plugs

when i bought my '99 TT, there was some ?lifter noise at an idle. Not knowing what oil was in the car, i changed oil to 15w-40 synthetic diesel, and engine has quieted down. there was also some metal deposits on the drain plug.

i think the first number in oil rating is the true base oil, and the viscosity improvers (additives) thicken up the oil once oil reaches operating temperature.


I think most 15w40 is syn blend.


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I believe you have it backwards. The base viscosity is the latter value. They add "pour point depressants" to enhance flow characteristics at low temperatures.
Well, i'm not so sure. I'm currently at a holiday inn express .

from my underatanding, there are multiple additives in oil, and i think the pour point depressents isolate the "wax" particles floating in the cold oil, to prevent them from clogging up, like plaques in our arteries. The viscosity enhancers are actually long "rubber" molecules, and when cold, are shriveled up balls, kind of like shrinkage. As the oil heats up, the molecules get excited, and these rubber polymer "balls" unravel, elongate, and mimic long hydrocarbon molecules, increasing the viscosity of the oil at higher temperatures. I believe it is these viscosity enhancers that enable the oil to be more consistent in viscosity over a broad temperature range. As the oil ages, these rubber polymers break down, and the oil becomes thinner, more like the base oil, of which the base oil is more resistent to breakdown than the viscosity enhancers.

It's easy to make a thin oil thicker at higher temperatires. It's much harder to make a thick oil thinner at lower temperatures.

i think this is correct.
 

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Engine oil viscosity refers to how easily oil pours at a specified temperature. Thin oils have lower viscosity and pour more easily at low temperatures than thicker oils that have a higher viscosity. Thin oils reduce friction in engines and help engines start quickly during cold weather. Thick oils are better at maintaining film strength and oil pressure at high temperatures and loads. According to https://cararac.com/engine_oil/, the first number in the oil classification refers to a cold-weather viscosity. The lower this number is, the less viscous your oil will be at low temperatures.
 
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