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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been noodling around the forum trying to finalize a decision to move from a Vette to a new SRT 10. The concerning point (and no I am not a pussy but want to live to see a few more years :nod:) is around the theme of the Viper safety. I dont intend to race the car like many of you simply use it for fun on the weekends. Many of you talked about dramatic spin outs, and other issues -- if someone simply respects the torque and the car is it manageable especially an SRT 10? When you first bought your Vipers did you have alot of problems getting used to the car? When driving around town, down to the beach, etc in normal driving conditions how much of a beast is it? Trying to finalize my decision and certainly appreciate your feedback. Thanks in advance!

:thumb:
 

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Best advice I can muster is go to a driving school, preferably Viperdays, before you do much wide-open throttle with the Viper. Stay away from cold roads and tires, moisture on the road, etc., as well. It's simply amazing how much torque these things have. There is very little margin for error if the rear end breaks loose, and it will, count on it.
If you can't wait for Viperdays, take your new snake to a deserted parking lot late at night and get a feel for the break-away points.
Too many of these cars get smashed up in the first couple of months of ownership... A shame...
 

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I agree...just don't be reckless. I have had my Viper for over a year now, it just got S/C and going in for more work. The car is a beast, but if you are careful and don't drive like a maniak, then you should be alright.
 

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I just went from a Z06 to a GTS, and I'm a fucking maniac in anything with wheels. The GTS ain't much different then the Z06 with the traction control off. You have to be more careful in the curves because the Viper seems to have more of an oversteer as opposed to the vette where you had to jump on the gas to get it to turn. Other then that, it's the same deal. Don't be stupid on the gas and the car won't bite you. Hell, I drove it home from the dealership 500 miles in a raging rain/snow/sleet storm, and it was a pain in the ass, but not un-manageable.

Moe Colontonio
'02 Yellow/Black GTS
 

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I did the same thing, went from a Z06 to a GTS. Totally different feel than the Z, requires way more driver attention and input. But thats the fun! I gave it a bit too much gas on a turn and felt the rear break loose slightly, that woke me right up. The Z never would have done that with traction control on. But you learn, get the feel of the car and respect it and you wil be fine and LOVE it. I certainly do, don't regret for a second trading my new '04 Z06 for this. This car is not only super fun to drive, it is stunning looking. Be ready to have people stare at you non-stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Guys I appreciate the insight and thats whay I thought. Respect the torque plain and simple. I take my kids in the Vette today (1 at a time :idea:) and would want to do the same with the Viper. Thought the car had something about it given some of the comments that appeared to suggest its simply unmanageable. Again, I didnt pick that up in the test drive but thats a short pop and then done. I agree simply get used to the car, be responsible and enjoy the fun! Any additional insight for a newbie (i.e. give Vette Keys to Dodge guy, get in 2005 SRT 10 Viper and leave dealership) would be most wonderfully appreciated! :thumb:
 

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I'll just reinforce one point: there is very little about a Vette that prepares you for driving a Viper. This is personal experience. A guy near me wiped out his SRT-10 in the first two weeks he owned it; he had lots of experience with fast cars and driving fast, but he lost it. I almost lost it (with wife in car) the first month or so I had my snake. Fact is, they don't give a lot of warning before they break loose, and you need to experience that so you can avoid it. Just saying "don't do anything stupid" doesn't help when you don't know where the "stupid line" is. You learn that through experience. You can get that experience in a safe way (tracking with pro instructor, or on a skid-pad) or in a painful way.
 

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safety has nothing to do with the car its the driver and the right foot, period. driving class is a good idea for some, and common sense is priceless. as for safety, the SRT10 with its braking, handling and etc is a very safe car if driven responsibly
 

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Having owned all three generations of Vipers, the SRT hadling and grip level is an order of magnitude above the Gen2 chassis, which in turn, was an order of magnitude above the Gen1. You can really feel the difference in power-down traction between the GTS and SRT. The propensity for an unsuspected snap spin is greatly reduced in the current package, but the huge torque levels are not to be taken lightly. Once you lose the back end of a Viper, it stays lost. /images/graemlins/laughing.gif
 

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I have to agree with GTS Dean. There is a definate difference in feel from Gen-2 to Gen-3. However, take it from me, a guy who almost lost it in my SRT when it was about a month old, into oncoming traffic, in a straight line, in THIRD gear, at only 50 MPH, in the DRIZZLE. Not rain, DRIZZLE!!! And that was after 20,000 miles of trouble-free driving like an asshole in my GTS which was modified moreso than the SRT-10...and I drove that car in everything but snow on occasion!

Once you lose the back end of a Viper, especially in the rain, get a flashlight and a map- its gonna take a while to find it.
 

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You can drive a Viper w/ virtually no sports car experience just fine for years if you drive it like your Grandma's Buick.

BUT, if you want to explore the potential of the car and indulge in it's capabilities, then you should get an instructor and a private track rental with lots of runoff room. Walls are not your friend when you are learning how to drive a Viper like a raped ape.

You would not believe how many people I see pointed in the wrong direction on the track at Viper Days. :nod:
 

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Roll into the throttle instead of just quickly flooring it until you can tell if the road surface and your tires can handle a real quick transition when starting to drive on any given day works for me. Road surfaces and tire grip changes with temperature and what given day you are driving. Once you know where the safe limits are, your Viper will be all warmed up and ready to go. Be sure you have done something like ViperDays before really running your Viper hard and you should do OK.
 

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kat! where u been littleman, freezedried or doin hard time??

you coming to florida or you gonna be like waaaay too many other viper owners and miss the years BEST viper event in the world.
 

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I'm gonna be like waaaay too many other viper owners and miss the years BEST viper event in the world.
/images/graemlins/bawling

I posted some new photos in the gallery section so you can remember me, though.
 

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ROLLMODEL said:
You can drive a Viper w/ virtually no sports car experience just fine for years if you drive it like your Grandma's Buick.

BUT, if you want to explore the potential of the car and indulge in it's capabilities, then you should get an instructor and a private track rental with lots of runoff room. Walls are not your friend when you are learning how to drive a Viper like a raped ape.

You would not believe how many people I see pointed in the wrong direction on the track at Viper Days. :nod:
Yes, you said it better than I. The great thing about ViperDays is that they won't put you into a situation where you are likely to damage yourself or your car. Particularly at VIR, where I went to VD, the run-off areas are mostly very clear of things you might hit. ViperDays is also the most cost-effective way you can learn under constant supervision just what the limits of your car are.
 
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