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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are several tips and things to look at if you have any thoughts of perhaps stretching your Viper's legs and your comfort level a bit:

Helmet - The event organizers will specify the minimum Snell rating for participants' use. Many groups have loaner helmets for first-timers, but don't automatically expect that to be the case. If you know someone that tracks a bit, hit them up for recommendations. Your head and everything in it is irreplaceable. You can spend a lot of money, or a modest amount. Don't spend the least you can get away with, and don't buy a motorcycle helmet because they are cheaper. If you are thinking cheap, then find someone who will loan you a good one.

Tires - These are the #1 operational consideration for your safety and confidence.

Proper cold inflation pressures of 29 PSI are where you should always begin the day's activities. Proper inflation supports the tread and sidewalls from impact damage and assures proper transfer of accel, braking and steering forces through the suspension. When ambient temps are very hot, and under heavy cargo or speed loads, you can increase up to a max of 44psi.

Tread depth should be at least ~50% of original. All passenger tires have 4-digit numeric date codes molded inside an oval on one sidewall of each tire. "3319" would indicate manufacture on the 33rd week of 2019. Most performance driving or racing organizations will specify the oldest dates acceptable for use and this will commonly be 6 years. You need to confirm this yourself by checking ALL the tires, since they may not all be the same. The manufacturing oils and polymers in the casing and tread compounds oxidize and stiffen over time leading to lower traction and progressive cracking of the rubber.

Brakes - When you go from highway to track driving, this is #2 on the importance list.

First and foremost, you should have a full and complete flush and refill of your brake fluid performed. The fluid is hygroscopic - meaning it absorbs moisture - and that lowers the boiling point of the fluid. Your front brakes provide at least 2/3 of the braking force of the car and the front calipers are always the first ones to get spongy from fluid boiling. If this ever happens under any circumstance, rapidly pump the pedal to get fresh fluid against the pistons and pads. Novice drivers tend to brake early and for long periods of time. That puts a lot of heat in the system and the only time that heat is drawn away is when your foot is off the pedal. Buy name-brand fluid that meets DOT 3 or DOT 4 standards and you are going to be fine. There are DOT 5 fluids out there as well, but cost increases a bit. Motul is a good fluid for most applications and is widely available. Check motorcycle shops if regular auto parts don't stock it. DO NOT USE ANY SILICONE BASED FLUID IN YOUR SYSTEM!

Brake Pads - Pads should be at least 50% of OE thickness because they will be worked hard. Pad thickness helps regulate the amount of heat transferred to the brake pistons and into the brake fluid. The stock pads are very good all-around performers and work from dead-cold to moderately high temps. HP pads have more heat tolerance and better bite, but they tend to dust more, can be squeaky and not stop as well when cold. You should be careful about "low dust" pads because they may tend to overheat and not to have the level of "bite" you want for the track.

Engine bay -

Coolant is a periodic regular service fluid that should be changed and maintained at proper levels. Gen 1 and 2 cars can be finicky about trapped air in the system, causing overheating from steam pockets and low fluid flow. If you have questions - ask away!

Engine Oil should be reasonably fresh and maintained at the top of the FULL mark. Take an extra quart or two to the track and check levels in between sessions.

Power Steering Fluid is another periodic maintenance fluid that should be flushed about every 10 years and filled with name-brand CORRECT fluid for your model. DO NOT USE ATF in Gen 1 or 2 steering systems! Be sure the cap is screwed down very snugly (but not wrench-tight) and check the cap between rounds. Caps are known to loosen at the track and hoses have been known to fail. This sprays oil on hot exhaust parts and can catch fire. Be sure caps are secure, hoses not rubbing and oil is at the proper operating level and you should be just fine.

Transmission and rear differential - Should be serviced per the Owner's Manual. Track driving tends to work the differential fluid pretty hard, so it should be reasonably fresh and have friction modifier added per spec.

Steering and Suspension - Your car should have no substantial pull on straight, level roads - or, under braking. If your car squirms around or darts under braking or over bumps and heaves, it should be carefully evaluated and repaired before committing to track time. Have your tie rods and wheel bearings checked for looseness by a competent shop. Ball joints should get a few shots of grease, but don't overdo it. Have your shocks checked for leaks.

Cockpit - Be sure the interior is free of any loose objects - especially those that come out from under your seat and then get under your heels when braking and cornering! It's best to pull everything except for a tire gauge, a pen, a note pad and some paper or small cloth towels. Be sure to wipe and vacuum the interior well because debris starts swirling around and can get into your eyes and nose.

There is tremendous enjoyment to be experienced in your Viper on a track! There's plenty to learn and there are always many knowledgeable owners who have been right where you are starting from to help you - just ask!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am always looking forward to my next track event!

Actually, I'm trying to get potential entrants enthused about the October event at the Indy road course. If not that, then getting ANY of our current Viper owners to a track and have some fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also please use proper hand signals no one gives two shits about how flamboyant your *** hand signals are...... The BMW driver shows a proper pass at the beginning...
What a fucking TOOL! GTFO.

It looks like the ground the big hump just before my braking zone into T1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The guy was a jerk he couldnt have cared less about who was around him....
I can't stand people like that. In the video from the TA1.0 at RA last summer you can see he was held up by the ACR-E for a good while, then he caught up to me in the T12-14 complex. I was watching him close - and as soon as he really caught me up, I moved right over so I didn't hurt his time. He remarked later how good my track awareness is and I take that as a high compliment.

I can understand a beginner being uncomfortable, but the instructor in his car should have been helping him drive smarter.
 
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