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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are several tips and things to look at if you have any thoughts of perhaps stretching your Viper's legs and your comfort level a bit:

Helmet - The event organizers will specify the minimum Snell rating for participants' use. Many groups have loaner helmets for first-timers, but don't automatically expect that to be the case. If you know someone that tracks a bit, hit them up for recommendations. Your head and everything in it is irreplaceable. You can spend a lot of money, or a modest amount. Don't spend the least you can get away with, and don't buy a motorcycle helmet because they are cheaper. If you are thinking cheap, then find someone who will loan you a good one.

Tires - These are the #1 operational consideration for your safety and confidence.

Proper cold inflation pressures of 29 PSI are where you should always begin the day's activities. Proper inflation supports the tread and sidewalls from impact damage and assures proper transfer of accel, braking and steering forces through the suspension. When ambient temps are very hot, and under heavy cargo or speed loads, you can increase up to a max of 44psi.

Tread depth should be at least ~50% of original. All passenger tires have 4-digit numeric date codes molded inside an oval on one sidewall of each tire. "3319" would indicate manufacture on the 33rd week of 2019. Most performance driving or racing organizations will specify the oldest dates acceptable for use and this will commonly be 6 years. You need to confirm this yourself by checking ALL the tires, since they may not all be the same. The manufacturing oils and polymers in the casing and tread compounds oxidize and stiffen over time leading to lower traction and progressive cracking of the rubber.

Brakes - When you go from highway to track driving, this is #2 on the importance list.

First and foremost, you should have a full and complete flush and refill of your brake fluid performed. The fluid is hygroscopic - meaning it absorbs moisture - and that lowers the boiling point of the fluid. Your front brakes provide at least 2/3 of the braking force of the car and the front calipers are always the first ones to get spongy from fluid boiling. If this ever happens under any circumstance, rapidly pump the pedal to get fresh fluid against the pistons and pads. Novice drivers tend to brake early and for long periods of time. That puts a lot of heat in the system and the only time that heat is drawn away is when your foot is off the pedal. Buy name-brand fluid that meets DOT 3 or DOT 4 standards and you are going to be fine. There are DOT 5 fluids out there as well, but cost increases a bit. Motul is a good fluid for most applications and is widely available. Check motorcycle shops if regular auto parts don't stock it. DO NOT USE ANY SILICONE BASED FLUID IN YOUR SYSTEM!

Brake Pads - Pads should be at least 50% of OE thickness because they will be worked hard. Pad thickness helps regulate the amount of heat transferred to the brake pistons and into the brake fluid. The stock pads are very good all-around performers and work from dead-cold to moderately high temps. HP pads have more heat tolerance and better bite, but they tend to dust more, can be squeaky and not stop as well when cold. You should be careful about "low dust" pads because they may tend to overheat and not to have the level of "bite" you want for the track.

Engine bay -

Coolant is a periodic regular service fluid that should be changed and maintained at proper levels. Gen 1 and 2 cars can be finicky about trapped air in the system, causing overheating from steam pockets and low fluid flow. If you have questions - ask away!

Engine Oil should be reasonably fresh and maintained at the top of the FULL mark. Take an extra quart or two to the track and check levels in between sessions.

Power Steering Fluid is another periodic maintenance fluid that should be flushed about every 10 years and filled with name-brand CORRECT fluid for your model. DO NOT USE ATF in Gen 1 or 2 steering systems! Be sure the cap is screwed down very snugly (but not wrench-tight) and check the cap between rounds. Caps are known to loosen at the track and hoses have been known to fail. This sprays oil on hot exhaust parts and can catch fire. Be sure caps are secure, hoses not rubbing and oil is at the proper operating level and you should be just fine.

Transmission and rear differential - Should be serviced per the Owner's Manual. Track driving tends to work the differential fluid pretty hard, so it should be reasonably fresh and have friction modifier added per spec.

Steering and Suspension - Your car should have no substantial pull on straight, level roads - or, under braking. If your car squirms around or darts under braking or over bumps and heaves, it should be carefully evaluated and repaired before committing to track time. Have your tie rods and wheel bearings checked for looseness by a competent shop. Ball joints should get a few shots of grease, but don't overdo it. Have your shocks checked for leaks.

Cockpit - Be sure the interior is free of any loose objects - especially those that come out from under your seat and then get under your heels when braking and cornering! It's best to pull everything except for a tire gauge, a pen, a note pad and some paper or small cloth towels. Be sure to wipe and vacuum the interior well because debris starts swirling around and can get into your eyes and nose.

There is tremendous enjoyment to be experienced in your Viper on a track! There's plenty to learn and there are always many knowledgeable owners who have been right where you are starting from to help you - just ask!
 

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This is a great write up makes me want to hit the track again. People always forget about the loose crap in the car and trunk for that matter. If your going to bring along or need to have a fire extinguisher make sure it is properly secured a loose fire extinguisher can hurt you and something you cannot release easily is useless.

Missed in my opinion;
Check your wheel nut torque if you race with the same tires you drive in with.
Come with a full tank of gas if your a first timer, there is nothing worse than a newbie running out of gas or asking around for some of your race fuel.

Try to learn the course in advance, a group of non race friends surprised me with some track time for my birthday. Would have been much more fun if I had a chance to study the brake and turn in points (circle track) in advance.
 

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You missed one point. A competent driver.

Television program Formal wear Event Sharing Font


I assume you're prepping for another event. If so have fun and be safe!
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am always looking forward to my next track event!

Actually, I'm trying to get potential entrants enthused about the October event at the Indy road course. If not that, then getting ANY of our current Viper owners to a track and have some fun!
 

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A general note, if you do not feel comfortable doing your own work find a shop that ONLY does track cars. I was riding shotgun in red group when someone had a brake failure. The shop that did his brakes did not tighten the right front bleeder screw properly, on his third session it backed out enough and shot fluid coating the inside of the wheel causing him to go off at T11 at Cota going over 100 mph.

Tracking is fun but if the car is not up to the task the consequences can be catastrophic, luckily the car did what it was designed to do and the driver walked away with small cuts and bruises.

i can also say for sure the Germans are the dumbest fucks in the world for where the put the neutral switch..... Climbing under a Supra today was not on my list of things to do.... Fortunately I had the tools to help

Which brings me to my next point, bring tools. You can buy a mechanics tool set at Lowes or home depot throw that and a full set of wrenches in the car you never know when the belly pan on a MKV supra will need to be removed.....


The comment about learning the track is a good one as well, I have turned hundreds of laps at cota in various games I knew where the car needed to be which helped tremendously during the first session.
 

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Also please use proper hand signals no one gives two shits about how flamboyant your *** hand signals are...... The BMW driver shows a proper pass at the beginning...


 

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If you're drifting, an extra set of front wheels/tires mounted on the rear will make for extra fun and predictability. You can then rotate them front/back until all four are corded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also please use proper hand signals no one gives two shits about how flamboyant your *** hand signals are...... The BMW driver shows a proper pass at the beginning...
What a fucking TOOL! GTFO.

It looks like the ground the big hump just before my braking zone into T1.
 

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What a fucking TOOL! GTFO.

It looks like the ground the big hump just before my braking zone into T1.
Yeah looks like more grinding i couldnt feel the bump but i bet F1 notices it, I was using that as my braking point as well.... 🤣

The guy was a jerk he couldnt have cared less about who was around him....
 

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I am always looking forward to my next track event!

Actually, I'm trying to get potential entrants enthused about the October event at the Indy road course. If not that, then getting ANY of our current Viper owners to a track and have some fun!
I wish I lived closer to you out there as I'd be hitting those tracks frequently. Here I'm limited but go to Limerock but go routinely. Was just there two weeks ago and the weather cooperated this year. It was a blast. Sadly, I was only one of 4 Viper in attendance at NASA's event. We used to have dozens of Vipers attend over the years but they're scarce around here. NJMP, Pocono and VIR are great tracks as is Watkins Glen but a mess to get to with traffic around these parts. Probably going to Watkins in October. Next year I'm doing TT and will do the NASA NE circuit and see how it goes until I run out of money for tires.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The guy was a jerk he couldnt have cared less about who was around him....
I can't stand people like that. In the video from the TA1.0 at RA last summer you can see he was held up by the ACR-E for a good while, then he caught up to me in the T12-14 complex. I was watching him close - and as soon as he really caught me up, I moved right over so I didn't hurt his time. He remarked later how good my track awareness is and I take that as a high compliment.

I can understand a beginner being uncomfortable, but the instructor in his car should have been helping him drive smarter.
 

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Completely agree, I had a 488 behind me and the ONLY time he caught me was going into T12. I told the instructor I was going to make him work for the pass, a 4k pound sedan shouldn't put a 5 second gap on an F car through T12 to T20...... His instructor should have said let's just sit here and watch that wackos line in the grocery getter....

Some instructors are amazing and some I feel just want to get out of the car....
 
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