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Is there any way to speed up this slow process? Is it possible to just take the bottom radiator hose off, stick a hose in somewhere and flush it? I know tap water is not good, but I just want to use it to flush any crap out. Then add my distilled water and antifreeze.
Maybe one of those Prestone flush kits, or am I stuck doing this slow process again?
 

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The engine block drain plugs, which are located just inboard of the exhaust headers in the head, will allow you to drain ALL of the coolant. That said, these often freeze in place and are difficult to remove if they've never been removed before -- and they're relatively easy to "noodle". You'll need a 5/16" square drive to fit the drain plugs (measured across the flats). Sometimes a 3/8" socket extension will fit, but you'll want a very tight fit to prevent noodling them. If you noodle them removing them, they are common 1/4 NPT type drain plugs which you can get in a hardware store. I was able to remove mine fairly easily and was surprised at the quantity of coolant which drained from the heads. The cooling system took over 16 quarts for a refill (on a 2001 ACR). I replaced the drain plugs with engine block petcock type drain plugs (the type with a tiny hand-twist valve) using liquid teflon thread sealant. These are often available at marine supply stores (West Marine). The drain plugs were from Sierra part# 18-4218. Mine have held just fine (no leaks). One could drill holes in the valve wingnuts and safety-wire them. I'll probably do that the next time I have them out for a coolant change. If you don't drain the heads, you're probably leaving more than 3 quarts of old coolant in the heads. If you decide to just flush, I'd fill the cooling system with distilled water, run the engine for a few minutes, and drain that. The difference in volume (fill vs. drain) can be used to estimate how much distilled water remains in the cooling system so that you can figure out how to get a 50% mix.

If your thermostat is stock, you should open the little hard-to-get-to drain bolt on the thermostat housing to release air on refilling the cooling system. Air will get trapped under the thermostat -- which means it won't open and you can overheat your motor. A lot of people drill a small hole in the side of the thermostat when replacing them. This also makes burping the cooling system easier.

Hope this helps...
 

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Just before I left Neew Zealand to come here I met an inventor who had solved a problem that has largely gone unrecognized with water cooled engines. He brought his invention over to my place and he demonstrated it for me. I think there is a huge potential for it here and around the world - but educating people of the need is the biggest problem.

Coolant goes OFF after about 2 years - like sour milk. Flushing the engine and radiator still leaves significant residue - EVEN using commercial flush pump kits, there are pockets in the castings where casting sand, scale, and coolant residue just don't "flush" - PLUS a lot of the build up is not loosened by the currently available methods.

What happens when you add fresh milk to a little bit of sour?

That is what happens to your engine after you flush - its better than it was - but the next coolant will go off a LOT quicker than the original did.... and it gets worse over time.

A lot of engines that have "mysterious" over-heating or running hot issues compared to other identical engines that run normal - is due to something as simple as excess casting sand lodged into the water jackets in nooks and crannies - and sand is not a good thing in your cooling system.

This invention uses a low pressure/high volume PULSE that literally shakes off anything in the system that can be loosened, and vibrates out the crap that is unreached by pressure and normal flushing methods.... it is amazing what it brings out of en engine said to be "clean" by traditional methods.

Do not use high pressure as it will break seals - the system is not designed for high pressure. But very high volume, going by a pulse, at operating pressure - say 10psi - gets the job done.

According to the experts - 80% of engine failures have been traced back to some heat related problem - so having a coolant system in top shape is the best insurance you can have.

I was going to see if we could get one of those machines over here. They are expensive - but like a vending machine - if you sat one in a busy workshop and charged $100 a flush (they are easy to hook up and a truck or car can be done in under an hour) - then they'd make a good investment for the owner, for engine longevity and in customer service. Awesome for fleet operators.

This machine was so successful most public workshops would not get one because they earn money when things break, and extending engine life was not their interest (they were that honest about it too.... lol). However the truck fleets and workshops that did try it are very impressed, as is the NZ Army, now using them on their military vehicles.... also used a lot in boats because they suffer most - sitting around so much. The machines are fully portable and can do a small car engine up to 1000+hp diesel.

If there is genuine interest - I will remake the connection and enquire about getting a machine to the USA as a start.... there's a business opp here for the right person/people, I just don't have the spare capital to do this - especially not alone.

The product is better than anything out there - this guy did his research. I will definitely want to get a machine into the Torquemonster servicing plan once my main venture is operational, because I want my customer cars to last longer than anyone elses making that kind of power.
 

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I've always flushed it by using a radiator flush kit. To help "speed up" the process I used my air compressor. I would cup my hand over the radiator fill area, the use the blower attachment. I don't worry about blowing any seals because so much of the air leaks out from my hand. It helps. I haven't done it with my viper yet so it maybe different then any of my other cars/trucks.
 

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Tanked - the system is only designed to handle very low PSi pressure.... cupping your hand over the outlet is not exactly scientific...

Don't beleive me? try this - grab the air nozzle and cup your hand around it while you aim it up your butt... while some of the pressure will escape - I'm picking you'll still get one HELL of an air enema,

followed by a surgery or two after you've picked a few bits and pieces of yourself off the floor you might need later :nod:
 
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